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Upper Midwest sees massive rise in suicide rates

iStock/Thinkstock
iStock/Thinkstock

(NEW YORK) — Suicide rates increased in nearly every state in 2016 with rates increasing more than 30 percent of half of states, according to a newly released report from the Centers for Disease Control.

The CDC says that more than 45,000 Americans age 10 and older dying by suicide in 2016.

The issue has attracted additional attention this week after the death of designer Kate Spade, who was reportedly dealing with depression and anxiety.

The CDC report found that suicide rates among women have risen at an even higher rate than the overall suicide rate, with significant increases in the suicide rate among women in 43 states.

North Dakota had the highest rate increase at 57.6 percent, but the report found that the rate increased more than 30 percent in 25 states, including South Dakota, Montana, Wyoming, and Kansas.

The CDC researchers found that more than half of Americans who died by suicide had not been diagnosed with a mental health condition. The report says that substance abuse, financial stress, and relationship problems or loss all contribute to suicide risk.

“Suicide is a leading cause of death for Americans and it’s a tragedy for families and communities across the country,” CDC Principal Deputy Director Anne Schuchat said in a statement. “From individuals and communities to employers and healthcare professionals, everyone can play a role in efforts to help save lives and reverse this troubling rise in suicide.”

The study released Thursday looked at trends in suicide rates from 1999 to 2016 and data from the National Violent Death Reporting System that includes data from 27 states.

The CDC recommends that the government, health care system, employers, schools, and community organizations treat suicide as a public health issue and provides resources on its website.

The National Suicide Prevention Hotline is 1-800-273-TALK (8255) or www.suicidepreventionlifeline.org.

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